Fishing port

port-de-peche-web

THE FISHING PORT: Installations for professionals

French Polynesia extends on almost 5,5 million km² of economic exclusive zone, mostly made up of a maritime area of 121 islands spread over 5 archipelagos in the middle of Pacific Ocean. French Polynesia beneficiates from important halieutic resources only exploited to 30% of its richness.

After several years of crisis, public powers reorganise deep-sea industry by dialoguing with professionals, producers and wholesale sea-fish merchants. Management of the port has also been revised and from the end of 2009 and it will be entrusted to S3P semi-public company (which includes the Port Authority of Papeete, the “CCISM”, the SOCREDO bank and some private companies). The mission of S3P is to provide fishermen of professional fishing’s flotilla works and equipment necessary for their activity.

Located in the North-East zone, between the Papeava river in the east and the Motu Uta bridge in the West, the Fishing Port is an integral part of the Port of Papeete. Infrastructures concern quays and embankments used for mooring of fishing vessels of tuna boat type and for unloading of their catch.

Equipment and infrastructures

The fishing port has 3 quays for deep-sea fishing activity of 150, 90 and 150 metres in the North of Fare Ute. It has 8 pontoons of 90 m long which can welcome major part of the deep-sea fishing flotilla (tuna longline fishing boats), which represents around 100 fishing vessels.

Superstructures are for victualling of vessels (ice, baits) and storage and commercialisation of fishes in a fish trade building managed by the Chambre de commerce, de l’Industrie, des Services et des Métiers until 2009. A partnership was born between this organisation, the Port Authority of Papeete and the State so as to provide fishermen of professional fishing’s flotilla works and equipment necessary for their activity. Besides, private investments were made by the Mobil company for victualling fuel for fishing vessels in the South of the dock.

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